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Cooee Australia

$45.00$75.00 $22.50 - $37.50

Coo-ee was first recorded written in a notebook by one of the first fleet in 1789. It was notated in music in 1801 by Baudin. Coo-ee was part of the colonial form of speech by around 1840 in Australia and that was in New Zealand too. It was being shouted out in the old streets of London by the 1840’s by the colonists and was absolutely part of Australia’s national identity for it was a smasher for attracting attention out country over far and yonder land calls. It would have gone down a treat in old London Town for the colonists shouting out coo-ee for it was common to have town criers shouting out ringing a bell with all the latest news.  A loud call from out in the outback to tell folk where you be that is if they are within the range of the coo-ee. So, I reckon if you ain’t in coo-ee range you ain’t blimmin near it and possibly in a bit of a pickle. It was also used as a call for recruitment come First World War with the call of the Dardanelles and coo-ee a fair reminder for the soldier’s fighting overseas of home sweet home. For the word was used in songs and ballads poems and even three cheers were replaced with three coo-ee’s.  Roaming through the bush one day he saw a pretty maid her eye was bright as sunshine yet soft as evening shade. Her look was sad her gaze was wild, and often did she sigh and in a silvery timid voice uttered a wild cry. Coo-ee Coo-ee Coo-ee echo caught the train, Coo-CooCoo-ee Coo-ee it echoed back again, this is an old Australian song. Now I have explained the word coo-ee I will embark on the explaining the picture. It is a symbol of Australian unity with the wild flowers bordering the picture. The word coo-ee bringing people together bringing Australia together.

The young solider sits on a mountain range on either side a kangaroo and in the mother’s pouch a joey a baby kangaroo. They are a little family and the soldier is holding onto the kangaroos looking at the sun coming up over the bush. The mountain range is high it is a symbol of thought of distance of fore sight. Like looking back in time, it represents making decisions and the bush well the outback can be wild and rugged and tough. The baby kangaroo represents the next generation and innocence. The solider represents the fight that we will always have to be fought to have our freedom and the sacrifice given by them. He also tells the story of The Coo-ee March which was from Gilgandra to Sydney a march to recruit new soldiers to fight in the war as enlistment dropped. It was started by two brothers’ in Gilgandra a western town on Castlereagh river and 25 coo-ee volunteers marched from Gilgandra on the 10th of October 1915. By the time they got to Sydney there was 277 recruits for the army they arrived on the 12th of December they had stopped in most of the towns along the way. It looks a simple picture but that in itself tells one that something can look simple to achieve and be taken for granted but take century’s to create.

Printed on quality 200gsm gloss art paper. Packaged and sent in a mailing tube to protect edges.

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SKU: Cooee Australia Categories: ,
Description

Coo-ee was first recorded written in a notebook by one of the first fleet in 1789. It was notated in music in 1801 by Baudin. Coo-ee was part of the colonial form of speech by around 1840 in Australia and that was in New Zealand too. It was being shouted out in the old streets of London by the 1840’s by the colonists and was absolutely part of Australia’s national identity for it was a smasher for attracting attention out country over far and yonder land calls. It would have gone down a treat in old London Town for the colonists shouting out coo-ee for it was common to have town criers shouting out ringing a bell with all the latest news.  A loud call from out in the outback to tell folk where you be that is if they are within the range of the coo-ee. So, I reckon if you ain’t in coo-ee range you ain’t blimmin near it and possibly in a bit of a pickle. It was also used as a call for recruitment come First World War with the call of the Dardanelles and coo-ee a fair reminder for the soldier’s fighting overseas of home sweet home. For the word was used in songs and ballads poems and even three cheers were replaced with three coo-ee’s.  Roaming through the bush one day he saw a pretty maid her eye was bright as sunshine yet soft as evening shade. Her look was sad her gaze was wild, and often did she sigh and in a silvery timid voice uttered a wild cry. Coo-ee Coo-ee Coo-ee echo caught the train, Coo-CooCoo-ee Coo-ee it echoed back again, this is an old Australian song. Now I have explained the word coo-ee I will embark on the explaining the picture. It is a symbol of Australian unity with the wild flowers bordering the picture. The word coo-ee bringing people together bringing Australia together.

The young solider sits on a mountain range on either side a kangaroo and in the mother’s pouch a joey a baby kangaroo. They are a little family and the soldier is holding onto the kangaroos looking at the sun coming up over the bush. The mountain range is high it is a symbol of thought of distance of fore sight. Like looking back in time, it represents making decisions and the bush well the outback can be wild and rugged and tough. The baby kangaroo represents the next generation and innocence. The solider represents the fight that we will always have to be fought to have our freedom and the sacrifice given by them. He also tells the story of The Coo-ee March which was from Gilgandra to Sydney a march to recruit new soldiers to fight in the war as enlistment dropped. It was started by two brothers’ in Gilgandra a western town on Castlereagh river and 25 coo-ee volunteers marched from Gilgandra on the 10th of October 1915. By the time they got to Sydney there was 277 recruits for the army they arrived on the 12th of December they had stopped in most of the towns along the way. It looks a simple picture but that in itself tells one that something can look simple to achieve and be taken for granted but take century’s to create.

Printed on quality 200gsm gloss art paper. Packaged and sent in a mailing tube to protect edges.

Additional Information
Weight 1 kg
Dimensions 10 × 15 × 10 cm
Size of Print

A2 size (420 x 594), A3 size (297×420)

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